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West of Here Music Video: Run

As you may know, the three brothers in West of Here are my cousins. This has been able to give me great experience, as well as a great time! A lot of people came together to make this video happen, and for that I am truly thankful.

Some Fun Facts About This Video

We borrowed my grandpa’s suburban, and loaded it full of guitars, drums, and changes of clothes, and drove 12 hours to BC, where Power to Change was going to film for us. We decided to stay a few extra days to spend time with some family friends who lived in BC.

Eric Fawcett figured that he was going to commit to the whole “vegetarian Seventh Day Adventist” diet while on the trip. He tried a variety of classic dishes such as “Big Franks” (Hot dogs), “Grillers” (Hamburgers), and “Stripples” (bacon).  He felt that the “stripples” were absolutely no substitute to bacon, the “grillers” were flavourless, and the “Big Franks” were VILE.

We finished off our trip with a night of beach volleyball with friends. An evening that I’m sure we’ll all remember for a very long time.

The drive home took us roughly 20 hours due to a landslide on the major highway. Although it would have been faster for us to go back the way we came and go south, we decided to go North, which added an extra 4-6 hours. Nobody complained though, as we were all just happy to be home.

Some memorable “slogans” or “sayings” that formed during this trip were:

“No XP lost”: Eric’s response to Taylor playing computer games the entire trip home.

“Good Fight Deer”: Taylor’s response when we narrowly avoided hitting a deer on the drive up.

“Out for a tip”: A slogan that came up while playing volleyball.

“Frick Eh?”: Classic Canadian.

“Go back to Lumby”: It essentially means you fail at life.

Some Behind the Scenes comments

This video was filmed in two days, the first for the actual running around and stomping, and the second for the performance. It was quite the mess of driving to different locations, meeting different people in those different locations, and trying to stay somewhat on schedule. Somehow we managed to pull it all together, and were able to get the shots we need. In my opinion, it turned out quite well considering that we had to try and pull together a crowd in a city where, we didn’t know very many people. I want to thank everyone who came out and helped us with that.

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Let’s talk about the editing…

With over 450 gigabytes of raw footage, eight performance takes and 200 B-roll clips. This was quite the beast. I started off first by setting up the performance. I recalled that we had taken audio, and properly slated for each take. So the first thing I did, was line up the appropriate audio for each camera. I then put a marker on the first beat of the song, and made a multicam clip of all 16 camera angles over 8 takes. All perfectly synced up to the music. Once I had done this, it was as simple as choosing the best shots. A process that maybe only took me about 20 minutes.

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Once I had done that, it was just a matter of plugging in the B-roll, and lining that up with the music. A process that nearly killed me, but it turned out well in the end!

 

Thanks for reading! Feel free to comment on this video, or get in touch with me if you have any further questions! Also, go and follow West of Here on Facebook, Instagram, youtube, and/or Twitter! I know they would appreciate it!

West of Here Introduction

I’m very fortunate and blessed to be able to have some relatives who are just starting up their own band! Not only do I get to promote them, but I also get to practice my interview skills! You can check them out at WestofHereBand.com. Their music video is coming soon!

Some Behind the Scenes

My aunt and I wrote up some embarrassing questions – such as “what do you do about the screaming female fans” and “which one of you is the most attractive”, put them in front of the camera, and forced them to answer. We interviewed them all individually, so that we could get a bit more variety out of the answers. After we had warmed them up with the funny questions, we hit them with some of the more difficult, personal questions. This worked quite well as they had just gotten comfortable, and okay with being embarrassed on camera.